TEA FACT…

The Village Kitchen...

Tea for the British…

An English collector of traveller’s tales by the name of Samuel Purchas mentioned in 1625 in ‘Purchas His Pilgrimes’ that the Chinese ‘use much the powder of a certaine herbe called chia of which they put as much a a walnut shell may containe, into a dish Porcelane, and drink it with hot water’….In 1637, the Cornish traveller Peter Mundy wrote that the people of Fukien in China’s Fujian Province ‘gave us a certain Drinke called Chaa which is only water with a kind of herb boyled on it’.

So when Thomas Garraway started offering tea for sale at his general store in Exchange Alley in the City of London in 1657, it was not a totally unknown drink, but till Garraway recognised the need to advertise and, in 1660, wrote his famous broadsheet entitled ‘An Exact Description for the Growth, Quality and Vertues of the…

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FREE CAKE FRIDAY (terms & conditions apply) #THEVILLAGEKITCHEN…

The Village Kitchen...

If you haven’t tasted our ‘Apple and Blackberry Crumble Cake’ cake of the week, then you don’t know what you have been missing.

Enjoy it with a pot of delicious tea ( lots of choice) for just £4.75 of take a piece home for tea for just £2.25. Or Enjoy aFREE slice of cake on a Friday when you purchase a meal and a drink to enjoy after your meal or to take home for later.

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HOW THE CHINESE DRANK TEA IN THE 3RD CENTURY…

The Village Kitchen...

Until the 3rd century AD, under the Han Dynasty (AD 206 -220) the Chinese drank tea as a medicinal tonic brew made from the freshly gathered leaves of the wild tea tree. For the next 700 or so years, the plucked leaves were steamed and then compressed into tightly packed cakes of different forms which could be easily stored or transported with minimum damage. To brew tea from these cakes, the brick or cake was roasted and then chopped or crushed, and steeped or boiled in hot water. The infusion was then often flavoured with sweet onions, salt, ginger, orange peel, cloves and mint.

The Tealover’s Companion – Jane Pettigrew & Bruce Richardson

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