TEA COCKTAILS, A DIFFERENT TASTE ON TEA…

If you go to the Tate Galleries in London, Liverpool or St.Ives you will see that they supply JING teas.

JING One Cup Tea-iere for Loose Leaf tea

JING is run by Edward Eisler and his team. By building relationships with the worlds finest tea farmers in China, India, Sri Lanka, Japan and Taiwan, JING hand sources not only the finest teas and herbal infusions, but also special, rare teas which are seldom seen outside their country of origin.

They supply tea and teaware directly to customers through their website and offer full tea service concepts for the world’s best hotels, restaurants and retailers, in the finest British and modern-oriental styles.

Tate has a carefully selected JING tea range, including some of our most popular loose teas and herbal infusions including Darjeeling 2nd Flush, White Peony, Jasmine Pearls, Yellow Gold oolong, Rooibos and Lemon Verbena. Our whole leaf tea bags are also available to take away at Tate Modern.

Matcha Shaker

The barmen on the top floor of Tate Modern have put together some great cocktail recipes using their teas. The menu includes inspired twists on established classics like Martini, Negroni and Rob Roy, using our Earl Grey, herbal infusions and Lapsang.

All of the tea cocktails use tea syrups. To make these syrups, simply pour into a pan a 300ml cup of tea and add 150ml of sugar. Heat the mixture and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Taste for strength and add more tea leaves if needed. Depending on the cocktail, this syrup should be enough for 10 or more cocktails.

Bamboo Tea Tray

FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT GRANDMA’S APRON..

The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few.

It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.

And when the weather was cold Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the Autumn, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, to tell us it was time to come in for dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

Grandma would also set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters now set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.