THE HISTORY OF BABYCHAM…

Babycham was created in the 1940s by Frances Showeing where it became one of the first drinks actively promoted to the middle-classes. Post-war, it was one of the first adverts to appear on television and it was targetted specifically at women.

The first Babycham Deer leapt into our lives and onto our glasses in the 1950s.  He was a white deer standing upright at first with all four legs together. In the 1960’s the deer turned into a golden brown colour with a loose blue bow.
In the 1960’s and 70’s, it became an international icon for chic. It was also very important in Somerset as the drink maker employed around 1,000 people.

During the late 1970s, a champagne flute with the well known yellow deer came into circulation with no wording around the base and no gilt trim. It remained as a champagne flute into the 1980’s but the deer changed from yellow to fawn and he lost his antlers.

In the 1990’s the deer disappeared with a rebrand of Babycham which they did in the hope it would appeal to both sexes. However, by 1997 the deer returned for the female sex.

You can still find Babycham in the supermarkets now and of course, it always tastes better out of a Babycham glass whatever decade it originates from!

VINTAGE GROCERY BRANDS, FIFTIES STYLE…

The hardware shops of the fifties were where you could get most of your household goods as supermarkets were not up and running then. It was home for household items like balls of string, cook’s matches, mothballs, toilet blocks and nails. You could also purchase crockery, cutlery and cooking equipment.

Some of the traditional cleaning products survived the war and are still around today. Those who have changed little in their design including Brasso (in the can), Lux Soap Flakes, Tide Washing Powder and Ajax Scouring Powder. Other popular brands include Harpic, Flash and Surf. Of course, laundry detergents were quite different with optical brighteners like Reckitts Blue which would be added to the final rinsing water to ensure the linen was whiter than white.

Even some of the old breakfast cereals are still going strong, Kellogg’s Cornflakes and Frosted Flakes (now known as Frosties) Shreddies, Quaker Puffed Wheat, and Scotts Porridge Oats.

Although the fast food was not happening until the middle of the 1950’s there was plenty of canned foods around like, soup, luncheon meat, corned beef and tinned fruit and vegetables. Frozen foods were also starting to become popular with fish fingers being one of the first ones on the market.

Of course, there are still a number of stock cupboard items still going strong now including Marmite, Oxo, Bisto, Colemans Mustard Powder and Atora Suet. Diet drinks were not available at that time but Tizer, Lucozade, Kia Oran Pepsi and Coca-cola topped the list of favourites.

If you still love some of your oldies then try the British Corner Shop below.

The British Corner Shop is a unique online supermarket for expats around the world. Whether you miss Marmite or crave Warburtons crumpets, they can deliver your British favourites straight to your door.

Their website stocks over 10,000 products from Britain’s most loved brands, meaning you can enjoy the British food you miss, wherever you are in the world.

Customer service is at the heart of their business. Since their humble beginnings in 1999, they have refined and developed British Corner Shop, building on the wants and needs of their loyal customers.

From purchasing your shopping through to the delivery, they want their customers to have total confidence when ordering with them.

You don’t have to be a British expat to use the service. If you have friends or relatives overseas who may be missing the taste of home, why not order them a box of British happiness? Their service is perfect for sending parcels of British food to Brits in the Armed Forces and others working abroad.