VINTAGE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING BOOKS…

Before 1800, housekeeping books tended to be handwritten collections of recipes and instructions tried and tested by the household cook. By the 1850’s they were developed into books for ‘adult women’, in particular for your brides who were setting up home.

They were intended as work manuals, they were without lavish photography or even set in fine bindings but if you can get hold of one from a book shop they will amaze you. They tell us about the lives of the women in the past from where you can see social change and the disappearance of domestic servants.

Mrs. Breton’s Book of Household Management, which was published in 1861 was a huge success and sold 60,000 copies in its first year and two million by 1868. Of course with no television at that time these books were inspirational.

By the time Helen Simpson wrote ‘The Happy Housewife’ in 1934 modern appliances were starting to pop up everywhere, not only helping with the housework but also removing the servants of that time.

In ‘Keeping House’ with Elizabeth Craig (Collins 1936) she said ‘ I have no use for elaborately decorated or furnished homes or for elaborate meals. The simpler the home, the simpler the housekeeping.

Some of these vintage home books can now fetch a lot of money at auction. A book published in 1687 ‘The Accomplished Ladies Rich Closit of Rarities’, by John Shirley sold at Sotheby’s for £1,625. So, if your great aunt or grandma is still alive and has some old cookery books make sure they don’t end up at the tip.

Even the National Trust ‘Manual of Housekeeping of 2006’ sold 10,000 copies in 2006 !!!!!!!

ESCAPE FOR A FEW HOURS IN ROSIE’S TRAVELLING TEA SHOP…

Although this amazing book “Rosie’s Travelling Tea Shop” by Rebecca Raisin is not actually a proper tea shop but the title for a book I just had to pop it on here for others to enjoy. The story is all about Rosie who has a swanky job as a Michelin-Starred Sous Chef, a loving husband and future children scheduled for exactly January 2021.

That’s until she comes home one day to find her husband’s pre-packed bag and a confession that he’s had an affair.

Heartbroken and devastated, Rosie drowns her sorrows in a glass (or three) of wine, only to discover the following morning that she has spontaneously invested in a bright pink campervan to facilitate her grand plans to travel the country.

Now, Rosie is about to embark on the trip of a lifetime, and the chance to change her life! With Poppy, her new-found travelling tea shop in tow, nothing could go wrong, could it…?

There is just so much to love about this story that I actually could not put it down and read it over two days. My hubby could hear me laughing out loud at parts of the book. Its a real uplifting story and something we could all enjoy reading at the moment. I bought mine from Amazon as I am a big Kindle reader but I am sure is available in other good book shops.

HOUSEKEEPING BOOKS THROUGH THE CENTURIES…

Before 1800, housekeeping books tended to be handwritten collections of recipes and instructions tried and tested by the household cook. By the 1850’s they were developed into books for ‘adult women’, in particular for your brides who were setting up home.

They were intended as work manuals, they were without lavish photography or even set in fine bindings but if you can get hold of one from a book shops they will amaze you. They tell us about the lives of the women in the past from where you can see social change and the disappearance of domestic servants.

Mrs Breton’s Book of Household Management, which was published in 1861 was a huge success and sold 60,000 copes in its first year and two million by 1868. Of course with no television at that time these books were inspirational.

By the time Helen Simpson wroteThe Happy Housewife‘ in 1934 modern appliances were starting to pop up everywhere, not only helping with the housework but also removing the servants of that time.

In ‘Keeping House’ with Elizabeth Craig (Collins 1936) she said ‘ I have no use for elaborately decorated or furnished homes or for elaborate meals. The simpler the home, the simpler the housekeeping.

Some of these vintage home books can now fetch a lot of money at auction. A book published in 1687 ‘The Accomplished Ladies Rich Closit of Rarities’, by John Shirley sold at Sothebys for £1,625. So, if your great aunt or grandma are still alive and have some old cookery books make sure they don’t end up at the tip.

Even the National Trust ‘Manual of Housekeeping of 2006’ sold 10,000 copies in 2006.

The Good Housekeeping Institute have written a book The Art of Good Housekeeping in 2010 which is packed with tried and tested answers to every household query, from how often you should clean your duvet, to how to maintain the exterior of your house.

CLEAN CAKES BOOK REVIEW…

Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman – what a beautiful name for a cookery book. When I browse Amazon for cookery books I do find that it’s the front picture that promps me to find out more about the book.

This cookbook is for anyone who enjoys baking as well as experimenting with new and alternative ingredients. It provides a wealth of ideas for cooking everything from spectacular cakes, energy-boosting muffins and wholesome loaves to stunning raw desserts and scrumptious tarts and pies, with distinctive flavour combinations and original twists on established classics.

It’s great for anyone who for health or lifestyle reasons wants to eliminate gluten, dairy or refined sugar from their diet but who still wants to satisfy their sweet tooth and create their own nutritious guilt-free masterpieces.

Henrietta Inman embraces nutritious whole food ingredients that are unprocessed, unrefined, natural, seasonal and local wherever possible. The first section shows how to stock your Clean Cakes larder, as well as including foundation recipes such as cashew cream, nut butters and homemade jams. She goes into great detail on dairy free alternatives to yoghurt and buttermilk, dairy free alternatives to cream and cream cheese, and dairy free alternatives to milk.

Next come over 75 beautifully photographed recipes, from rich chocolate brownies, a show-stopping courgette, basil, lime and pistachio layer cake and raw desserts to five grain omega mix granola bars, spectacular fruit pies and enticing savoury tarts. These recipes are for everyone and show that cooking healthily doesn’t have to mean compromising on flavour.