DELICIOUS FRUITS AND VEGETABLES TO ENJOY DURING JULY…

Here is a list of some lovely fruit and vegetables in season for the month of July…

Vegetables to harvest or buy

  • Beetroot
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Courgettes and summer squash
  • Cucumbers
  • Fennel
  • French beans
  • Lettuce and other salad leaves
  • New potatoes
  • Peas and mangetout
  • Radish
  • Runner beans
  • Tomatoes
  • Spinach
  • Spring onions
  • Shallots

Some delicious fruits to enjoy in July include…

  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries
  • Currants
  • Gooseberries
  • Loganberries
  • Raspberries
  • Tayberries

If you head over the National Trust Website they have lots of interesting things to read including Talking About New potatoes from Jersey or further afield appear on supermarket shelves very early in the year, but most British new potatoes, especially those grown at home, only come into their own now. Planted in March or April, new potatoes do best if they receive plenty of rain during May and June while their tubers are swelling.

They have some great gardening tips plus some amazing July recipes which include Potato, Pepper & Courgette Curry, Greek Salad, Peacamole, which if you haven’t heard this before is a tasty twist on guacamole, try this delicious green dip made from peas. Fall in love with this refreshing recipe, that’s an easy way to get everyone eating more vegetables.

Other recipes include delicious Cheese & Tomato Muffins (which are to die for) and Pickled Raddish & Vegetable Stew.

AWARENESS DAYS/WEEKS AND FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST…

August has a few fun awareness events which include Yorkshire Day on 1st August, National Allotment Week from 9th-14th August and Afternoon Tea Week from 9th-14th August…

Yorkshire Day 1st August –

The date alludes to the regimental anniversary of the Battle of Minden on 1st August and the wearing of roses in the headdress on that day.

In the case of the Light Infantry, successors to the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, a white rose.

The date is also the anniversary of the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, for which a Yorkshire MP, William Wilberforce, campaigned.

Yorkshire Day was established relatively recently in 1975. The nature of the region and its people meant it was quickly adopted and it has grown in significance year on year.

The decision to mark Yorkshire Day with an annual civic gathering of Mayors, Lord Mayors, their attendants and other dignitaries ‘in full costume and regalia’ was taken at a meeting of Local Authorities within the boundary of the old county of Yorkshire i.e. the three ridings and York and The Yorkshire Society at County Hall, Wakefield, on 29 June 1985.

The Yorkshire Society was then charged with the guardianship of the idea and organising the annual event, which now forms the centrepiece and focal point for the celebrations undertaken across the whole region.

The ‘Official Yorkshire Day Civic Celebration’ now adds pomp and circumstance to a day of pride for a region which is like a nation within a nation: having its own flag, its own language, own anthem (almost) and its own culture. It is undoubtedly the biggest gathering of ‘first citizens’ and civic leaders in the UK and probably one of the biggest in the world.

The first Yorkshire Day Civic Celebration in 1985 was held in York. Since then the council and Mayor of different towns and cities have had the honour of hosting it. Year on year it has evolved into an established format comprising breakfast reception and robing, thanks-giving service, street parade of all the dignitaries and guests and a formal lunch to finish.

From 2018, when The Yorkshire Society itself began a modernisation, the event has evolved further with the last two hosts, Ripon City Council and Whitby Town Council, expanding it into the community and encouraging the participation of the general public with additional themed elements. As such, the Official Yorkshire Day Civic Celebration is now a catalyst for the host town or city, providing an opportunity to boost the local economy, capture the attention of the world and connect with its citizens.

The host town or city has the honour and prestige of being the official Yorkshire Day town or city for a full calendar year. This is marked with the handing over of the Yorkshire Day flag from council to council on the day, each council adding its coat of arms to the flag to record its year.

National Allotment Week – 9th-14th August – Celebrating all the home growers from the seasoned pros to those giving it a go for the first time.

There’s nothing quite like growing your own fruit and vegetables. Wonderful, fresh, seasonal produce straight from the earth and into your kitchen.

Lighting up when you realise that seed you planted just a few short weeks ago has transformed into a magnificent pumpkin. Harvesting that wonderful, fresh produce straight from the earth and turning it into something sensational in the kitchen. 

What are your top tips for first-time growers? Share your stories and pictures with us this week on Instagram

The National Allotments Week theme for 2022 is Bugs, Bees and Broccoli and acknowledges the importance of gardening with nature in mind.

An allotment plot is a complex web of plants, micro-organisms, fungi, insects and animals that not only produces food but also supports eco-system services such as pollination and offers a refuge for wildlife in urban areas.

Get involved and take this fun, easy survey on your plot this summer to contribute to the monitoring of mini beasts.

Whether you are a member of the NAS or not, young, old or somewhere in between –  this is a great way to get everyone down on the allotment and work towards the preservation of insects in the UK.

Download the survey

‘Bugs are so important to the healthy functioning of our allotments. As gardeners we tend to focus on the ‘pests’ and ignore all the great work the other bugs are doing for us, but if they were not we would miss them be it pollinating our fruit and veg, controlling our pests or improving our soil they are vital to healthy growing.’

Afternoon Tea Week 9th-14th August NAPA invites you to join thousands of care settings as we come together to celebrate Afternoon Tea Week 2022.

We love an Afternoon Tea at NAPA and feel excited about all the opportunities a week of tea-based activities and events can inspire.

Afternoon Tea Week is the perfect opportunity to take part in a range of activities that celebrate this quintessentially English tradition;  to meet people, chat, dance, laugh and eat a lot of cake – that is washed down with some delicious tea served in a fine china cup!

We have a series of NAPA Resources designed to support you to enjoy all that Afternoon Tea Week has to offer. Our resources have been created following consultation with NAPA members, thank you to all those who provided their feedback and shared their ideas and positive practice examples. We hope you find the information helpful and that you are inspired to plan fantastic Afternoon Tea Week celebrations!

Afternoon Tea Week celebrates the great British tradition of Afternoon Tea and is the perfect excuse to catch up with loved ones over a cup of tea and some expertly created treats.

Check out Afternoon Tea website for news of exclusive promotions, menus and special events to celebrate the nation’s favourite pastime. 

Source: The Yorkshire Society The Soil Association The National Allotment Society NAPA Afternoon Tea Week