VINTAGE GROCERY BRANDS, FIFTIES STYLE…

The hardware shops of the fifties were where you could get most of your household goods as supermarkets were not up and running then. It was home for household items like balls of string, cook’s matches, mothballs, toilet blocks and nails. You could also purchase crockery, cutlery and cooking equipment.

Some of the traditional cleaning products survived the war and are still around today. Those who have changed little in their design including Brasso (in the can), Lux Soap Flakes, Tide Washing Powder and Ajax Scouring Powder. Other popular brands include Harpic, Flash and Surf. Of course, laundry detergents were quite different with optical brighteners like Reckitts Blue which would be added to the final rinsing water to ensure the linen was whiter than white.

Even some of the old breakfast cereals are still going strong, Kellogg’s Cornflakes and Frosted Flakes (now known as Frosties) Shreddies, Quaker Puffed Wheat, and Scotts Porridge Oats.

Although the fast food was not happening until the middle of the 1950’s there was plenty of canned foods around like, soup, luncheon meat, corned beef and tinned fruit and vegetables. Frozen foods were also starting to become popular with fish fingers being one of the first ones on the market.

Of course, there are still a number of stock cupboard items still going strong now including Marmite, Oxo, Bisto, Colemans Mustard Powder and Atora Suet. Diet drinks were not available at that time but Tizer, Lucozade, Kia Oran Pepsi and Coca-cola topped the list of favourites.

If you still love some of your oldies then try the British Corner Shop below.

The British Corner Shop is a unique online supermarket for expats around the world. Whether you miss Marmite or crave Warburtons crumpets, they can deliver your British favourites straight to your door.

Their website stocks over 10,000 products from Britain’s most loved brands, meaning you can enjoy the British food you miss, wherever you are in the world.

Customer service is at the heart of their business. Since their humble beginnings in 1999, they have refined and developed British Corner Shop, building on the wants and needs of their loyal customers.

From purchasing your shopping through to the delivery, they want their customers to have total confidence when ordering with them.

You don’t have to be a British expat to use the service. If you have friends or relatives overseas who may be missing the taste of home, why not order them a box of British happiness? Their service is perfect for sending parcels of British food to Brits in the Armed Forces and others working abroad.

BRITISH CORNER SHOP…

The British Corner Shop is a unique online supermarket for expats around the world. Whether you miss Marmite or crave Warburtons crumpets, they can deliver your British favourites straight to your door.

Their website stocks over 10,000 products from Britain’s most loved brands, meaning you can enjoy the British food you miss, wherever you are in the world.

Customer service is at the heart of their business. Since their humble beginnings in 1999, they have refined and developed British Corner Shop, building on the wants and needs of their loyal customers.

From purchasing your shopping through to the delivery, they want their customers to have total confidence when ordering with them.

You don’t have to be a British expat to use the service. If you have friends or relatives overseas who may be missing the taste of home, why not order them a box of British happiness? Their service is perfect for sending parcels of British food to Brits in the Armed Forces and others working abroad.

MARMITE IN BAKING, LOVE IT OR HATE IT…

Marmite love it or hate it that’s the question? Well, according to The Telegraph there are some fascinating facts that you might not know about.

Marmite may boost brain power and could even help stave off dementia, research suggests. A study has shown that those who ate just a teaspoon of the yeast extract each day saw changes in the electrical activity of their brain.

Researchers from York University said the high concentration of Vitamin B12 in Marmite increases levels of chemicals which are thought to protect against neurological disorders.

The study found that those who consumed a teaspoon a day for a month showed a 30 percent decrease in their brains’ response to visual patterns, compared with those who were given peanut butter.
Marmite was thought of as an essential food for a healthy diet. So essential in fact that it was included in soldiers’ ration packs during World War One and has subsequently been used to treat conditions ranging from malaria to malnutrition.
It can help you sleep better, add it to two slices of wholemeal toast in the morning (each of which will provide around 8pc of that RDI) and you’ll be well on the way to sleeping well come nightfall.
Marmite is packed with B vitamins (not just B3) that are essential for good health – containing so much per serving that you can probably do away with taking expensive B supplements. It’s high content of Vitamin B1 could also be highly beneficial for preventing cardiovascular disease, particularly among diabetics.
Marmite can also help you with a hangover. Alcohol consumption depletes your body’s store of B Vitamins, which can leave you feeling low and anxious, and so a teaspoon of Marmite on toast can help replenish your body’s supplies in no time. If you can’t stomach the thought of solids, try the Sri Lankan hangover cure: apparently they dissolve Marmite in hot water, before adding lime juice and a sliced fried onion.
A study published by the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggested that niacin (of which Marmite is plentiful) can help the body fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA.
As for using it in cooking, there are lots of recipes online using Marmite including Chocolate Cake with Marmite Caramel Butter Cream. , Marmite Popcorn, and even Marmite Sausage Rolls.
There is also a gene test you can now take called The Marmite Gene Project, the study commissioned by the Unilever brand gives weight to its long-time marketing slogan, “Love it or hate it”. DNAFit, the genetic testing centre behind the research, has published a scientific white paper detailing how people are genetically more likely to be lovers or haters of Marmite.