7 FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT THE SCONE…

This Scottish Quick Bread is said to have taken its name from the Stone of Destiny (or Scone) the place where Scottish kings were once crowned.

Scones became popular and an essential part of the fashionable ritual of taking tea in England when Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788 – 1861), one late afternoon, ordered the servants to bring tea and some sweet breads, which included scones.

It is especially popular in the UK, US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and Ireland.

The original triangular shaped scone was made with oats and griddle-baked.

Today’s scones are more flour-based and baked in the oven and made of wheat, barley or oatmeal with baking powder. They can include raisins, currants, or cheese.

In 2005 it was estimated that the UK scone market was worth £64m, showing a 9% increase over the previous five years.

Scones can be savory or sweet and are usually eaten for breakfast, but are also served with tea and in coffeehouses.