SHROVE TUESDAY/PANCAKE DAY FOLLOWED BY ASH WEDNESDAY…

Straight after Valentines Day comes Shrove Tuesday/ Pancake Day on Tuesday 16th February.

The day always falls on the seventh week before Easter.

It is also the day before Ash Wednesday which marks the beginning of the the period known as Lent.

The tradition of eating pancakes stems from the time when people were trying to use up rich foods such as eggs, milk and sugar before the fasting season of Lent. It is traditionally a period where you stop eating certain foods i.e. sugar, fats, flour and eggs. They would empty their cupboards of these products and make lots of pancakes before lent started.

It takes place 47 days before Easter Sunday and pancake races have been going around for years. London has a number of famous ones.The Parliamentary Pancake Race starts from the Victoria Tower Gardens but due to Covid-19 has been cancelled this year as have many other well known pancake races in the UK. . The Parliamentary Pancake Race has has probably the most high-profile participants which feature three teams made up of MP’s, Lords and members of the press to help raise funds for the charity ‘Rehab’.

Some original fillings for your pancakes start with chocolate (yum, yum) fruits, syrups, fudge, sugar and ice cream, or of course, flamed with brandy (crepe Suzette).

My favourite site for recipes is the BBC Good Food Pancake Day Selection with 56 to choose from including Red Velvet Pancakes and G & T Pancakes and yet G & T as in gin and tonic. What more could you ask…

The following day is Ash Wednesday.

It marks the first day of fasting, repentance, prayer and self-control. Luxury or rich foods such as meat and dairy are often avoided by those taking part in Lent. Also abstention from personal ‘bad habit’s such as watching television or eating too much sugar is also commonly practised. It is a day in which Christians go through a period of 40 days of fasting, designed to help them remember the same amount of time Jesus spent fasting in the Wilderness. 

Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities — Saturday Club

Valentine’s Day is coming up! Here are some links to fun and easy crafts and activities you can do with your kids: The Vivify Stem website has some fun science and math oriented valentine’s projects including sampling strawberry DNA, sending a coded message, making a candy grabber, and stacking candy hearts: https://www.vivifystem.com/blog/2020/2/4/12-valentines-day-stem-activities CRAFTS SewYeah from […]

Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities — Saturday Club

Odlums Coconut Flour & Peanut Butter Pancakes — Foodaware — My Meals are on Wheels

CategorySpecialty Flour Share What you need: 60ml Alpro Almond Milk 30g/1oz Coconut Flour Good pinch of Bread Soda 2 tablespoons Kelkin Smooth Peanut Butter 2 Eggs Slightly Beaten 1/2 Tablespoon Rowse Honey 1/2 Medium Banana Mashed Coconut Oil for Frying How to: In a bowl mix Peanut Butter, Eggs, Honey, Banana and Almond milk until […] […]

Odlums Coconut Flour & Peanut Butter Pancakes — Foodaware — My Meals are on Wheels

FORAGING NEAR THE COAST…

Foraging –

forage/ˈfɒrɪdʒ/Learn to pronounceverbgerund or present participle: foraging

  1. (of a person or animal) search widely for food or provisions.”the birds forage for aquatic invertebrates, insects, and seeds”
    • obtain (food or provisions) by searching.”a girl foraging grass for oxen”
    • search (a place) so as to obtain food.”units that were foraging a particular area”

Foraging has become quite a popular word or late and no more than by the coast and countryside. In fact, you can go on numerous Foraging Courses where with this particular one Bushcraft and Celtic folklore specialist, Jonathon Huet, will take you on a guided walk to forage for wild food and impart his knowledge on different native trees in each season. The walk ends with a primitive fire-lighting demonstration and you will experience a Celtic Fire Ceremony around the glowing embers of the fire and learn the folklore of native trees.

There are short breaks when life gets back to normal or study your local district coastal foraging information. The UK coastline is one of the largest in Europe and is host to a wide range of habitats. From machair to cliffs to salt marsh, providing homes for everything from plants to birds.

Low Impact write how coastal foraging covers a wide variety of wild food available at the coast – plants, seaweeds, shellfish and crustaceans etc. Coastal foraging can be done everywhere from sea cliffs and dunes, out to the low tide point in the rocks, gullies and pools, as well as mudflats and estuaries. Coastlines offer a particularly abundant and one of the most dependable habitats for foragers. For these reasons, throughout our history humans have often chosen to live by the sea. Midden piles of discarded shells from ancient coastal foragers are the evidence that remains, and attest to the importance of the seashore as a plentiful food resource.

Some coastal food remains common in our diets today, such as prawns and crabs, and even carragheen seaweed hidden as a thickener in anything from toothpaste to desserts; whilst others, still delicious and nutritious, like winkles have fallen off the radar somewhat.

Coastal foraging can provide you with an abundance of truly nutritious food. In particular, shellfish offer a very high energy return with little input, and other than some low-cost (or even home made) equipment, it is free! Seaweed can be easily harvested and is high in vitamins and minerals.

Some coastal areas are now protected, either because of birds, flowers, insects, grasses and even due to the importance of the marine ecology under the waves, so its worth browsing your local councils website for more details of the type of areas you can forage.

You can find some great recipes from cookery books like The Seaweed Cookbook : A guide to edible seaweeds and how to cook by by Caroline Warwick-Evans and Tim van Berkel (Author), The Cornish Seaweed Company

 There are 100 deliciously creative recipes from simple and wholesome dishes to chef-inspired specials. Often overlooked during rock pool scrambles and beach walks, seaweed is one of the most nutritious, versatile, sustainable and intriguing natural products.

Another brilliant book is Eat The Beach : A Guide to Edible Seashore by Fraser Christian (Author)

Eat the Beach is a uniquely informative, practical guide to coastal foraging, essential for anyone interested in survival skills or just wanting to get more out of messing about in rock pools. Fraser Christian runs the UK’s only specialist Coastal Survival School. This book teaches anyone how to collect it, catch it, prepare it, cook it and enjoy it.

The website Low Impact go on to remind you that it’s worth taking the sea, and it’s changeable weather seriously, but don’t let it put you off. Check the weather before you go and particularly avoid disorientating sea mists or storms. It’s very important to be aware of the tide times, and the speed of the incoming tide. Because of the risks, it’s generally best to go with someone, and take a phone. It’s good practice to tell someone where you’re going and when you plan to be back.

UMITEASETS STUNNING COLLECTION FOR TEA LOVERS…

Umiteasets have a large selection of tea pots and loose tea to choose from so when this one popped through my door I couldn’t wait to give the tea and the pot a try.

Umiteasets say “It is said that long ago a man arid a woman, madly in love with, each other, saw their happiness destroyed by a lord who took the woman as a concubine. Driven half triad by this separation, the woman ran away to rejoin her lover only to find that the lord had had him killed.

When she found the body of her lover in the mountains, she wept so much that her tears formed a torrent and her petrified body was transformed into a tea tree. Even today, that is the explanation given for the year-long humidity and cloudiness of the area. Huangshan Maofeng: One of the top ten famous tea in China, is a kind of green tea. The tea is originated from Huangshan, Anhui province, where climate is mild, the number of rainfall is abundant and the soil texture is great, so there is very suitable for the growth of tea tree. As for Huangshan Maofeng tea, the technology of picking tea-tea leaves and drying tea is very delicate, purely manual making. In fact, the tea appearance present small and has a little intertangaling, cords fatness, and tea heart like sparrow’s tongue.

After brewing, the tea leaves present limpid blue light, tea water taste glycol, and the aroma smelling like orchid, lasting long times. Due to the new drying tea leaves with pekoe, the tea buds are also very different, and the fresh leaves are all picked from Huangshan Mountain Peak, hence its named Huangshan Maofeng tea. The tea is the curiosa in green tea, which through four working procedure: editing, rolling drying and baking. As we all know that the efficacy of Huangshan Maofeng are very rich, not only for one’s body, also for health care.

The tea is delicious and I love my little pot. With an array of teas, stunning tea pots and lots more on the Umi Tea Sets website it’s well worth having a look.