WHEN DID THE UK’s FIRST TEA SHOP OPEN?…

 

The Country’s first tea shop was opened in 1864 by the Manageress of the Aerated Bread Company. The company directors allowed the manageress to serve refreshments to favoured customers. Although Thomas Twining ‘s tea shop has also been claimed as the first, opening in 1706, and still remained at 216 Strand, London. However, 1717 is also given as a date for the first tea shop.

Then, demand for her service grew, which then sparked a new trend for similar shops across the UK. Within two years the Aerated Bread Company had opened 250 of its self-service tea shops.

These also helped to liberate the lives of women, as it was considered ‘perfectly proper’ and acceptable for a woman to meet her friends in a tea shop without needing an escort and without risk to her reputation.

Wikipedia explains how the business was created as an incorporated company listed on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). When the company was floated, its failure was predicted and its initial public offering was poorly supported. However, its initial £1 shares eventually rose to £5 7s8d by 1890. By 1898, shares had more than doubled from their 1890 value and were trading at £12 per share and declaring a dividend of 37½ percent. By 1899, A.B.C. shares had increased a further 16⅔ percent and were trading at £14 per share.

J. Lyons & Co opened their first Lyons tea shop in 1894 at 213 Piccadilly. It was the forerunner of some 250 white and gold fronted tea shops which occupied prominent positions in many of London’s high streets.

As well as the tea shops and Corner Houses, Lyons ran other large restaurants such as the Angel Cafe Restaurant in Islington and the Throgmorton in Throgmorton Street. Its chains have included Steak Houses (1961–1988), Wimpy Bars (1953–1976), Baskin-Robbins (1974-) and Dunkin’ Donuts (1989-). The artist Kay Lipton designed all the windows for the Corner Houses under the jurisdiction of Norman Joseph, the director post-war.

The Spruce Eats writes Tea was first brought to Britain in the early 17th century by the East India Company. It was an expensive product and one only for the rich and often kept under lock and key. Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II introduced the ritual of drinking teas to the English Royal Court and the habit adopted by the aristocracy. The British further developed their love of teas during the years of the British Empire in India.

BREW MONDAY SAMARITANS AWARENESS DAY 18th JANUARY…

Samaritans Brew Monday will kick off on 18 January, the third Monday in January, which is usually known as ‘Blue Monday’. They will be turning this day on its head and into something positive by encouraging people to get together over a warming virtual cuppa.

Reach out to a friend, family member or colleague for a virtual cuppa and a chat. It doesn’t have to be a Monday or a cup of tea, just taking time to really listen to another person could help them work through what’s on their mind. ​

Because now more than ever, sharing a cuppa is more than a drink – it’s about reaching out, checking in and staying connected.

Have a Brew Monday, any Monday, or a day that’s good for you.

Here are a few ways you can connect virtually:

  • Group audio/video calling is available on Zoom, Skype, Microsoft Teams, WhatsApp (up to 4 people on a call) and Facebook messenger.
  • A phone call or conference call can work just as well for connecting with people, especially for those not comfortable on camera.

And don’t forget, if you use your virtual get-together to raise money for Samaritans, you’ll help give people having a tough time somewhere to turn when they need to talk. Just £5 can help the Samaritans answer a call for help.

Want to fundraise?

Stay connected, get everyone together for a virtual cuppa and raise money for Samaritans.

Have a Brew Monday….

Every seven seconds, Samaritans answer a call for help.

They are there, day or night, for anyone who’s struggling to cope, who needs someone to listen without judgement or pressure.

Samaritans is not only for the moment of crisis, they are taking action to prevent the crisis.

They give people ways to cope and the skills to be there for others. And they encourage, promote and celebrate those moments of connection between people that can save lives.

They offer listening and support to people and communities in times of need.

In prisons, schools, hospitals and on the rail network, Samaritans are working with people who are going through a difficult time and training others to do the same.

Every life lost to suicide is a tragedy, and Samaritans’ vision is that fewer people die by suicide.

That’s why they work tirelessly to reach more people and make suicide prevention a priority.

Read more about our vision, mission and values.

During 2018, more than 20,000 people volunteered their time for Samaritans:

  • more than 17,000 trained listening volunteers responded to calls for help
  • 2,200 volunteers supported the running of our 201 branches
  • more than 1,200 people in prisons volunteered as trained Listeners providing peer support.

Read more about Samaritans’ structure and how their volunteers, staff and branches work together.