10 TIPS ON BREAD MAKING FOR “REAL BREAD WEEK “…

Following on from my post on Real Bread Week 20th – 28th February, here are ten tips on making bread.

  1. When baking bread, put the empty baking tin upside down in the oven beforehand to heat up. Then when you drop the dough in it, it puffs up and creates a lighter bread.
  2. Always use the right yeast, the easiest type to use in home baking is the fast acting/easy-blend dried yeast which most bread machines use.
  3. Warm up your utensils before starting the process.
  4. Always warm your milk, only slightly but just enough so that the yeast isn’t slowed down by the fat in the milk.
  5. Make sure you check and double check your salt quantity.
  6. Store your yeast at the correct temperature. Dried can be kept for a few months. Fresh yeast can be kept in the fridge for a week or two or could be frozen for up to 3 months.
  7. Make sure you measure everything correctly. Use digital scales. The smallest difference in just the amount of water or yeast can make a big difference to your bread.
  8. There are a number of different flours out there so try different ones.
  9. Throughout the process the dough should be kept warm ie at approximately blood heat, but it must NOT be overheated.
  10. Check rising time with each recipes as they can vary quite a bit and do not leave dough to just rise. Make a note of the time you left it and set an alarm to check it at the correct time.

And, enjoy with lashings of butter on…

Source : BHF

REAL BREAD WEEK FEBRUARY 20th-28th…

What is Real Bread Week?
Launched by the Real Bread Campaign in 2009*, this is the annual, international celebration of Real Bread and people who make it.

Each year, the Campaign encourages bakeries and baking schools in its supporter network around the world to organise hold classes, feasts and other events and activities.

Meanwhile, everyone else is encouraged to get along to a local, independent Real Bread bakery and support a business that helps to create more jobs per loaf at the heart of your local community and to keep your high street alive.
Doughy digits
One of the two main aims of the week has always been to encourage more people to bake their own Real Bread. We’re particularly keen to see more children learning to bake it, whether at home, in a bakery, baking school or in the classroom.

Not only is this great fun, but it’s a way helping them to avoid all of the artificial additives that turn up in industrial loaves. It can also be a way of steering them towards healthier food – you’d be amazed at the number of children who ‘don’t like wholemeal’ but love it when it was lovingly made by their own mitts.

Home baking
Recipes
Real Bread classes/courses
Discounts on ingredients, equipment, classes

NB loaves raised with baking powder / soda fall outside our definition of Real Bread
Bigging up little bakeries
It’s time to kick the additive-laden industrial loaf habit and support YOUR local Real Bread baker!

Small, independent, locally-owned bakeries help to:

support more jobs per loaf for people in your local community – skilled jobs at that
keep more money circulating in your local economy, helping to keep your high street alive

They may also offer social benefits, from being a place where older people at risk of isolation can see a friendly face and stop for a chat, to those that are set up to offer training and employment opportunities for people facing one of a range of challenges.

Don’t be fooled by so-called ‘artisan’ loaves turning up on supermarket shelves: insist on the real deal.

Look for The Real Bread Loaf Mark
Discover a local Real Bread bakery
Why support a local Real Bread bakery

Get involved!
How are YOU celebrating Real Bread Week this year?

Whether you’re a teacher, professional or amateur baker (or even a non-baker), there are plenty of ways to help people in your local community enjoy Real Bread…and maybe even raise dough for the Campaign at the same time.

Even better if you team up with local good food organisations and/or other small-batch food and drink producers to make a real party of it.

Here are a few more ideas of events and activities. You could organise a Real Bread:

beginners‚baking workshop
tasting dinner or pizza night perhaps in association with a local pub or eatery
lunchbox masterclass to share all the great Real Bread alternatives to soggy factory loaf sarnies with parents at a local school
club event to bring friends colleagues and neighbours together to bake
networking event for fellow breadheads

The more the merrier
Perhaps you could involve a community group such as your local:

School
Youth club
Scouts, Guides or other local youth organisation
WI group
Farmers’ market
Country Market
Slow Food group

Support the Charity

he best way to support our charity’s work is to join the Real Bread Campaign

You don’t have to be a baker to join us – in fact, the majority of our supporters aren’t.

Rates (unchanged since 2009) start from £22.50 a year, the equivalent of LESS THAN £2 A MONTH. 

Supporter benefits you’ll get to enjoy include our exclusive True Loaf magazine; and special offers on Real Bread ingredients, equipment, baking classes and more. Read more about why and how to join us.

Make a doughnation

If you’d like to make a one-off doughnation as well as / instead of joining us, you can do so here.

Help us to raise dough

Can your business make a special donation, or collect from your customers, during the week? Maybe you could send a percentage of your total sales, or just from a Real Bread Week loaf/class.

You can send what you raise to us by debit/credit card or PayPal payment via our doughnations page

Source: Awareness Days, Real Bread Campaign

DIFFERENT TYPES OF BREAD…

Bread comes in so many different types, from bagels, ciabatta, tortillas, potato, garlic, you name it you will find one out there.

 Bread is a low-fat staple food for many people and a good source of carbohydrates.

 They are made with different flours including white, wholemeal or wholegrain.

 Whole grains are grain foods in which all parts of the train are intact and retained during any processing.

 According to wikipedia ‘ Bread is a staple food prepared by cooking a dough of flour and water and often additional ingredients’.

 The Real Bread Campaign has absolutely everything you need to know about bread and more. The Real Bread Campaign are fighting for better bread in Britain. The national network brings together everyone who care about the state of bread in Britain.

 It has an online guide dedicated to helping you discover places to buy ‘Real Bread‘ and bread making courses and lessons on loaf.

 For me, ‘real bread‘ taste very different from processed breads and loaves and something I can never say ‘no’ to if it’s a freshly made one in a Restaurant.

 

 

BREAD OF LIFE…

bread

Bread comes in so many different types, from bagels, ciabatta, tortillas, potato, garlic, you name it you will find one out there.

Bread is a low-fat staple food for many people and a good source of carbohydrates.

They are made with different flours including white, wholemeal or wholegrain.

Wholegrains are grain foods in which all parts of the train are intact and retained during any processing.

According to wikipedia ‘ Bread is a staple food prepared by cooking a dough of flour and water and often additional ingredients’.

The Real Bread Campaign http://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/ has absolutely everything you need to know about bread and more. The Real Bread Campaign are fighting for better bread in Britain. The national network brings together everyone who care about the state of bread in Britain.

It has an online guide dedicated to helping you discover places to buy ‘Real Bread’ and bread making courses and lessons on loaf.

For me, ‘real bread’ taste very different from processed breads and loaves and something I can never say ‘no’ to if it’s a freshly made one in a Restaurant.