WHY HOUSEWORK IS ‘GOOD FOR YOU’

They are now saying that housework can count as an exercise (well I already knew that), and some tasks can actually help to improve your strength and flexibility.

They are now saying that housework can count as an exercise (well I already knew that), and some tasks can actually help to improve your strength and flexibility.

They are now saying that housework can count as an exercise (well I already knew that), and some tasks can actually help to improve your strength and flexibility.

They are now saying that housework can count as an exercise (well I already knew that), and some tasks can actually help to improve your strength and flexibility.

Apparently ironing isn’t at the top of the list for exercise but you can burn around 55 calories and it can make a significant difference to your core strength.

Vacuuming, however, can boost your core strength and can give your heart a good workout AND you could burn up around 100 calories each time. Yipeee, that means another KitKat bar for me…:)

Dusting and polishing will burn around 90 calories and helps increase flexibility as you reach up to corners and around furniture.

Changing the bed is also a good cardio workout and can burn up around 70 calories.

Finally mopping the floor is another good cardio workout for your heart and can burn around 100 calories.

Sooo, if I did all of the above on the same day that would mean I would have an extra 415 calories burnt up !!

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THE LAVENDER TEA ROOM IN BAKEWELL…

While on a day trip out to Bakewell we popped into The Lavender Tea Rooms for a spot of tea and cake.

It is centrally located in Hebden Court, in a charming courtyard setting. The decor is period and you feel like you have stepped back in time to a bygone era when you step inside the tea room.  It’s set over two floors with a lovely outside little courtyard with a few tables which have blankets on chairs in case the temperature drops. Dogs are also welcome in the courtyard area and they provide water bowls so your canine companion can enjoy a little refreshment too.

They offer an Afternoon Tea Deluxe, an extra special treat which consists of a pot of tea or cup of coffee, sandwiches with the choice of tasty fillings, a sultana scone, strawberry preserve and Rodda’s clotted cream, Bakewell Tart and a selection of cakes served on vintage five tier stands to add a touch of drama to the experience.

Other afternoon tea choices, starting with a pot of tea, a scone, jam and Roddas clotted cream, or a simple tea or coffee and a slice of one of their scrumptious which is what we had. The tea and cake was delicious and I am sure we will make another visit to The Lavender Tea Room next time we pop to Bakewell.

 

 

5 TOP TIPS ON CLEANING AN OVEN…

 

To clean any spills in the oven, sprinkle with automatic dishwasher powder, cover with a wet paper towel, let stand for a few hours, then clean with a damp sponge.

Or make your own oven cleaner from 1 tablesp of bicarbonate of soda mixed with a good cup of hot water. Wipe over the whole oven, including the glass door and shelves and the stains will gradually disappear.

Soak oven shelves, trays etc overnight in a solution of biological washing powder or dis washing powder and hot water and next day just rinse

Put one cup of ammonia in a glass bowl, and place it inside the oven and close the door. Let the bowl stay in the oven over night. The next day, use a green scrubby and wipe away those stubborn stains.

Lemon is a great grease cutter. To make lemon oven cleaner, mix equal parts of lemon juice and salt. Apply the lemon oven cleaner to oven stains and let it sit for 15 minutes. Use a green scrubby and rinse and wipe the oven clean.

7 FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT THE SCONE…

This Scottish Quick Bread is said to have taken its name from the Stone of Destiny (or Scone) the place where Scottish kings were once crowned.

Scones became popular and an essential part of the fashionable ritual of taking tea in England when Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788 – 1861), one late afternoon, ordered the servants to bring tea and some sweet breads, which included scones.

It is especially popular in the UK, US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Belgium, and Ireland.

The original triangular shaped scone was made with oats and griddle-baked.

Today’s scones are more flour-based and baked in the oven and made of wheat, barley or oatmeal with baking powder. They can include raisins, currants, or cheese.

In 2005 it was estimated that the UK scone market was worth £64m, showing a 9% increase over the previous five years.

Scones can be savory or sweet and are usually eaten for breakfast, but are also served with tea and in coffeehouses.

 

 

 

 

MAKE YOUR OWN VINTAGE CAKE STAND…

Beautiful cake stands are everywhere at the moment, but they can cost quite a lot of money. So make your own, it’s very easy.

All you need are two (or three) plates, a central rod, washers and a handle to hold it all together and bobs your uncle.

You can buy cake stand fittings from eBay from £2.29, with instructions and some with templates.

If it’s a two tier cake stand you want to use a dinner plate and a side plate. Measure the diameter of the largest plate and mark the centre with a pen, then do the same with the smaller plate.

A MUG OR A CUP FOR YOUR TEA?…

Which do you prefer a mug or a tea cup and saucer?

Personally, I think both are appropriate in certain situations. You would give the builder a mug, and yourself one while sitting reading your favourite magazine. Although if you were sitting in a nice tea room or having a cup of tea with a friend, I’m sure you would probably prefer the cup and saucer.

The other problem is which one to buy? Do you go for Cath Kidston’s latest designer mugs, Tesco’s Spell Out Mug ‘ Home is where the Heart is’, or an antique china tea cup and saucer that is so delicate that you cannot pop it into your dishwasher.

Personally, I only like my tea or coffee from a ‘china’ mug and would buy both Cath Kidston’s designs as well as quirky ones from Amazon like this classic Lionel Richie one ‘Is it tea you’re looking for’.

As for the antique china cup and saucers, well, I have plenty of those and now tend to buy them for my daughter who has started collecting them but NONE of them will go anywhere near my dishwasher.

THE VINTAGE TEA COSY…

Although Tea Cosy’s are back in fashion again the first documented tea cosy in Britain was in 1867 and it was probably the Duchess of Bedford, who by establishing the activity of afternoon tea in 1840, increased the popularity of tea cosy.

They then flourished during the late 19th Century and were also starting to be used in North America at the same period.

It is defined by Wikipedia as ‘a cover for a teapot, traditionally made of cloth or wool, which is used to insulate the tea, keeping it warm while it brews’.

Cloth tea cosies often have padded inserts which can be washed separately and many are hand knitted looking just like a woollen hat with a bobble on the top.

You can buy tea cosy’s from most places now including Amazon who sells the hand block printed ones, but you will find really original ones on Etsy like this Maroon and blue bobble style large tea cosy for £4.99, which is lovingly handmade by refugees from the Middle East.

Or this unique and original Succulent Tea Cosy -The only watering needed is to make your pot of tea. The grey wool ‘concrete planter’ cosy is double layered for extra warmth and the succulent leaves are hand cut so every plant is different, and available from Not on the High Street for £29.95

Of course this original design of tea cosy are the ones that I remember most, available from Etsy at £11.99 This tea cosy has been hand knitted in a quality aran yarn, making it soft and cosy, perfect for keeping your fresh brew toasty warm.