BUYING FAIR TRADE COFFEE TO HELP OTHERS…

When you choose Fairtrade coffee, not only can farmers build a better quality of life for their families and communities, they can invest in growing better quality beans too.

Fairtrade coffee farmers invest at least 25 percent of their Fairtrade premium in improving productivity and quality.

Choose Fairtrade coffee and you’re also supporting farmers to fight the challenges they may face.  These include the effects of a changing climate, low and unpredictable incomes and in some coffee-growing communities, there may not be enough food available for three to four months a year.

Being part of Fairtrade has meant better knowledge about protecting the local environment and the chance to plant other crops and buy livestock to put more food on the table.

Around 125 million people worldwide depend on coffee for their livelihoods. Coffee is the most valuable and widely traded tropical agricultural product and 25 million smallholder farmers produce 80% of the world’s coffee. But many of them fail to earn a reliable living from coffee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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POEM OVERHEARD IN A TEA ROOM…

Overheard in a Tea Room…

‘I do wish this teapot would pour like a dream!

Try one of these scones, I can pass you the cream’.

‘Well, thank you, but no, for I must watch my weight,

Just look at those slices of damson and date!’

 

; Just look at that table: I say, what a sight –

It looks like those women are starting a fight!’

‘I’ll wait for the cuckoo clock – mustn’t be late:

It’s supper at seven and soiree at eight.’

 

‘No manners these days – not a ‘thank you’ or ‘please’,

Those women are worse than the zoo’s chimpanzees’.

‘I do love Darjeeling and jasmine at four –

Tea settles the stomach; I’ll pour us some more’,

 

‘I really can’t take it – I wish I could stay:

The noise from that table will drive me a …!’

By Caroline Gill

THE RAREST JAPANESE TEA …

GYOKURO ASAHI TEA is the rarest Japenese tea of all, being grown in the Kyoto region under special bamboo shades to control the amount of sunlight to the plants. ‘Gyokuro Asahi’ translates to ‘noble dewdrop’ in Japanese

The fine emerald needle-shaped leaves give a bright, delicate exquisite infusion. This green tea is naturally sweet and strong and known the world over for its fantastic health benefits – it’s full of antioxidants, great for cholesterol and a fantastic weight loss aid. Gyokuro Asahi is grown in the shade, similar to matcha tea. This gives the tea its rich green colour and helps to boost its nutrients

This shaded growth and minimal oxidation allow this tea’s leaves to keep more of their natural nutrients and antioxidants.The extra shelter this tea is given during growth contributes to the strong, sweet and satisfyingly full-flavoured taste in every cup of gyokuru asahi.

9 REASONS TO DRINK TEA…

1.Drinking three cups of tea daily can protect against heart attacks and stroke.

2.A new review study shows regular drinking of either black or green tea can reduce the risk of heart problems by 11 percent.

3.It cuts plaque build-up in arteries – a combination of dangerous fat and cholesterol.

4.In terms of the delivery of antioxidants, two cups of tea is equivalent to five portions of vegetables or two apples, reports the journal Molecular Aspects of Medicine.

5.The review by researchers at the University of Western Australia says the benefits of tea are largely due to the flavonoid content, antioxidant ingredients that counteract cardiovascular disease, according to the Daily Mail.

6.One cup of tea provides 150-200 mg of flavonoids.

7.The review also found the flavonoid content of black tea is equal to that of green tea. Almost 80 percent of Britons are tea drinkers.

8.Four cups of tea with milk provides 21% of daily calcium requirement.

9.Catherine Hood from the industry-backed Tea Advisory Panel said: ‘Compared with the US studies, the cardiovascular benefits of tea are particularly strong in European studies. This includes UK studies where most of the tea consumed is black.’ Tea and Health Facts are available on the Tea Advisory Panel. 

SEVEN WAYS TO STORE TEA…

  1. It’s best to transfer both loose tea and teabags from a cardboard or paper packet or tub into an air-tight container.
  2. Tins and caddies with tight-fitting lids are good as they can keep out other smells and humidity which can affect the tea.
  3. Storing the jars in a dark cupboard will mean the tea will keep well.
  4. You should never keep it in the fridge as there is always the chance that water will get into the packet.
  5. You should always be careful with flavoured teas, as the added flavourings can be very powerful and easily taint other teas nearby.
  6. For loose tea, it is essential that you check that the spoon or scoop that you use is completely dry.
  7. If there is even a drop of moisture on the spoon, the humidity introduced to the interior of the packet or caddy will have an effect on the quality of flavour.

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR AFTERNOON TEA IN THE VICTORIAN ERA…


Instructions for an afternoon tea in the Victorian Era

Serve rolled bread and butter, sandwiches made of ham paste, potted ham, tongue or chicken.

The crusts of the bread should be cut off, and the sandwiches cut into three corner shapes or fingers.

Anchovy sandwiches or those made with cheese paste are liked by Gentlemen.

Salads are allowable nowadays at afternoon tea; egg, oysters, or chicken are suitable with brown bread and biscuits.

Cakes for this purpose should be very small.

Wine and cordial should always be on the sideboard, claret cup or champagne cup on the table.