THE VINTAGE TEA PARTY…

The Vintage Tea Party is a baking cookbook, but much more than just your average baking book by  Angel Strawbridge (Author).

Its a trip down memory lane, it’s a discovery fo the five things in life and it’s a book that will just as happily look good sitting on your coffee table.

It will definitely look good propped up in your kitchen being used again and again.

A talented book by a talented woman.

Product Description –
Vintage Patisserie is a vintage hosting company offering bespoke tea parties from a bygone era, delivering everything from music, makeovers and – of course – a customised menu of tea party treats that elevate any function into a swanky soiree. The Vintage Tea Party Book embraces the style and class of the trendy London Vintage scene and illustrates how to beautifully recreate the tasty treats and classic styles at home. With a unique mixture of recipes and feature spreads with accessible tips on hairstyling, makeup methods and where to collect vintage china — The Vintage Tea Party Book has it all.

“The Vintage Tea Party helps you plan not only stunning recipes for all sorts of delicious treats but also gives you countless styling tips for the perfect occasion.” – Glamour Magazine (SA)

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ONE OF MY FAVOURITE CAKE RECIPES PASSED DOWN FROM MY MUM…

One of my favourite cake recipes passed down from my Mum is Spiced Fruit Cake. 

Spiced Fruit Cake

Ingredients

150 g Marg or Butter

6 level tbsp golden syrup

250g raisins

250g currants

120g sultanas

120g mixed peel

120g chopped stone dates

1/2 pint plus 2 tables milk

Ingredients

1/2 teasp bicarbonate of soda

2 beaten eggs

250g plain flour

1 rounded teasp mixed spice

1 level teasp cinnamon

Pinch of salt

1 tbsp Apricot Jam, melted

 

Method

Preheat oven to Gas 3, 165C, 325F

Line a 7″ deep cake tin

Place all of the first list of ingredients in a saucepan and heat slowly until the butter is melted, then simmer gently for 5 mins. Cool

Stir in the bicarbonate of soda.

Add the 2 beaten eggs into the flour with the mixed spice, cinnamon, and salt but do not stir.

Beat both mixtures together thoroughly.

Place in the cake tin and bake for 13/4 – 2 hrs.

Brush edge with the heated apricot jam and arrange nuts and cherries around.

 

THE COUNTRY’S FIRST TEA SHOP…

The Country’s first tea shop was opened in 1864 by the Manageress of the Aerated Bread Company. The company directors allowed the manageress to serve refreshments to favoured customers.

Then, demand for her service grew, which then sparked a new trend for similar shops across the UK. Within two years the Aerated Bread Company had opened 250 of its self-service tea shops.

These also helped to liberate the lives of women, as it was considered ‘perfectly proper’ and acceptable for a woman to meet her friends in a tea shop without needing an escort and without risk to her reputation.

Wikipedia explains how the business was created as an incorporated company listed on the London Stock Exchange (LSE). When the company was floated, its failure was predicted and its initial public offering was poorly supported.[4] However, its initial £1 shares eventually rose to £5 7s8d by 1890.[5] By 1898, shares had more than doubled from their 1890 value and were trading at £12 per share and declaring a dividend of 37½ percent.[6] By 1899, A.B.C. shares had increased a further 16⅔ percent and were trading at £14 per share.[4]

J. Lyons & Co opened their first Lyons tea shop in 1894 at 213 Piccadilly. It was the forerunner of some 250 white and gold fronted tea shops which occupied prominent positions in many of London’s high streets.

As well as the tea shops and Corner Houses, Lyons ran other large restaurants such as the Angel Cafe Restaurant in Islington and the Throgmorton in Throgmorton Street. Its chains have included Steak Houses (1961–1988), Wimpy Bars (1953–1976), Baskin-Robbins (1974-) and Dunkin’ Donuts (1989-). The artist Kay Lipton designed all the windows for the Corner Houses under the jurisdiction of Norman Joseph, the director post-war.

BAKEWELL BAKING FESTIVAL 12th-13th AUGUST…

BAKING, VINTAGE, MUSIC AND FAMILY FUN…

The World’s Baking Festival is back for it’s 4th year with it’s new bigger Baking Theatres and a World Baking Theme.

Live Music, Tea Dances, Baking and Food Village, Vintage Games, Camping, Custard Pie Fight, World Alternative Games, Masterclasses, Vintage Car Display, Competitions, Circus Skills, Great Food and Drink, Birds of Prey, Comedy Night and more…

Tickets available online . Take a look at last years video here .

Bakewell has been voted the second best town in Britain by the Times, and is the quintessential English market town in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire, England, deriving its name from ‘Beadeca’s Well’.

It is the only town included in the Peak District National Park, and is well known for the local confection Bakewell Pudding (often mistaken for the Bakewell Tart).

It is located on the River Wye, about thirteen miles (21 km) southwest of Sheffield, 31 miles (50 km) southeast of Manchester, and 30 miles (48 km) north of the county town of Derby; nearby towns include Chesterfield to the east and Buxton to the west northwest.

Not the biggest town in the UK according to the 2001 Census the civil parish of Bakewell had a population of 3,979.
The town is close to the tourist attractions of Chatsworth House and Haddon Hall

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE GADGET OF THE 70’s

I have to say I would find it hard to say which was my favourite gadget of the 70’s as there were so many iconic devices that I would still us them now.

Can you remember the Breville toasted sandwich maker, the Swan Teasmade and the Soda Stream. Hostess trolleys, the pressure cooker and the stand mixer?

Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition at Olympia.

I  loved the toasted sandwich maker put I do remember it being a bit of a beast to clean and as for the Swan Teasmade well, I am not ashamed to say that I still have a Teasmade but not the original 1970’s one. I just love the fact that |I can wake up in a morning and have an instant cuppa.

The Soda Stream which was invented by Guy Gilbey (of the gin dynasty) in 1903. The reincarnated version is black and sleek. You do have to cough up around £50 for the basic model, but long-term, it could save you cash.

The Hostess trolley was another of my well used items of the 70’s and to be honest if I had the room I would have kept it as it is still useful when having parties but that was back in the day when ALL vegetables were overcooked and soggy so leaving them in the hostess trolley didn’t ruin the flavour at all.

Do you remember the pressure cooker ? It used to frighten me to death, I was sure it was going to blow up every time I used it and as for the stand mixer well I have some friends that still have their Kenwood stand mixer. The only piece left of that I have is the bowl used with the mixer which I still use when baking cakes.

What was your favourite 1970’s kitchen gadget, I’d love to know?

WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE 60’s CAKES RECIPE…

I was clearing out some of my books recently and came across my GCSE Cookery Book. It all came flooding back when I started looking through my recipes but one that stood out from the others was Rock Buns which I seemed to bake whenever I could. I even had some old photos of the first ones I made. You don’t hear of them nowadays but I thought I would share the old style recipe with you, in old style measurements. Enjoy …

Rock Buns

Ingredients

6oz Flour, 2-3oz Margarine, 2oz Currants or sultanas, 2-3oz Caster Surgar, 1 small tsp baking powder, 1/2 oz candied peel (chopped)1 egg and milk, 1/4 tsp mixed spice.

Method

Wash and dry the currants or sultanas. Rub the fat into the flour, and add the dry ingredients. Mix with a knife or fork to a stiff paste with beaten egg and milk. Put small heaps onto a greased baking sheet and bake in a hot oven for about 15 mins.

I love the way I haven’t even put ‘preheat’ the oven nor the oven temperature. Baking was sooooo much more laid back in those days.