Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities — Saturday Club

Valentine’s Day is coming up! Here are some links to fun and easy crafts and activities you can do with your kids: The Vivify Stem website has some fun science and math oriented valentine’s projects including sampling strawberry DNA, sending a coded message, making a candy grabber, and stacking candy hearts: https://www.vivifystem.com/blog/2020/2/4/12-valentines-day-stem-activities CRAFTS SewYeah from […]

Valentine’s Day Crafts and Activities — Saturday Club

VEGANUARY 1st-31st JANUARY 2021…

Join the New Years Revolution – Since 2014, Veganuary has inspired and supported more than one million people in 192 countries to try vegan for January – and beyond. They have worked with businesses to drive up vegan food provision in shops and restaurants, and have made veganism more visible and accessible through our work with national and international media.

Facts:

Over 1,000,000 participants since 2014

192 countries around the world

More than 1200 new vegan products and menus were launched for Veganuary 2020

98% would recommend Veganuary to a friend

More than 600 businesses took part in Veganuary 2020

Veganuary is a non-profit organisation that encourages people worldwide to try vegan for January and beyond. During the 2020 campaign, more than 400,000 people took their pledge to try a vegan diet, while more than 600 brands, restaurants, and supermarkets promoted the campaign, and launched more than 1200 new vegan products and menus in the UK market alone.

Throughout the year, Veganuary encourages and supports people and businesses alike to move to a plant-based diet as a way of protecting the environment, preventing animal suffering, and improving the health of millions of people.

The UK is now officially the world leader for vegan food launches. Mintel reports that around 16 per cent of new food products released in the UK in 2018 were vegan, which more than doubled the previous years’ output. Veganuary is cited as being behind this upswing.

Every January, retailers vie with one another to bring out more, bigger, and better vegan products and menus to capitalise on the huge popularity of Veganuary. But there work with businesses takes place year round! From the large multinational corporations, to the smaller high-street retailers – they offer support and promote their increased production of delicious animal-free items. In 2020, 600 companies promoted Veganuary and veganism, while there were more than 1200 new vegan products and menus launched during the month.

Some of the items that really got pulses racing were Gregg’s Vegan Steak Bake, Pizza Hut’s Pepperphoni Pizza, KFC’s Vegan Burger, Subway’s Meatless Meatball Marinara and Marks & Spencers’ No Chicken Kievs.

Their corporate collaborations are making plant-based foods so prevalent and so delicious that it is now easy for anyone to choose vegan options anywhere in the UK. They are now expanding this work globally!

Comedians like Romesh Ranganathan, Sara Pascoe and John Bishop have supported them; EastEnders’ Kellie Bright and Emmerdale’s James Moore are also Veganuary fans, alongside international athletes Hector Bellerin and Anthony Mullally. Paul McCartney has expressed his support for Veganuary and Brian May participated in January 2020 and plans to stay vegan. Joaquin Phoenix, Evanna Lynch, Chris Packham and Peter Egan are just a few of their incredible Ambassadors! This publicity is crucial to get veganism and, more importantly, the reasons to choose vegan, in front of a mainstream audience.

Their work with businesses doesn’t stop at product and menu collaborations, they also encourage them to run a Veganuary Workplace Challenge in January. In 2020 several large and influential businesses, including Pizza Hut Restaurants, Marks & Spencers, Price Waterhouse Cooper, Booking.com, Deliveroo and Ernst & Young took part and encouraged their staff to try vegan for January as well as providing more vegan options in staff canteens.

They also work with social media influencers, including some of the most exciting plant-based chefs, inspiring activist kids and animal campaigners with worldwide audiences.

They share their work with media around the world, and are happy to supply statements and images, statistics and case studies. As a result, Veganuary has appeared in every major UK publication and on every major UK television channel. Their message has spread worldwide – from the Los Angeles Times to the South China Morning Post.

THEIR VALUES

Impact: They are committed to a vegan world; they will utilise research to evaluate how the highest number of lives can be spared and direct resources to that end. 

Empowerment: They will optimise there outreach to support and encourage people on their vegan journey in a non-judgmental, positive, constructive, and easily accessible way. 

Collaboration: by partnering with other mission-driven organisations and working closely with corporates, they will make a bigger difference. 

Diversity and inclusion: they know that it takes people with different ideas, strengths, interests and backgrounds to achieve their vision; they appreciate the value of this and how it brings them closer to achieving their mission. 

Respect and integrity: in all internal and external relationships, they will strive for genuine, honest, and transparent communication. 

Resilience: they will continue to create a professional and sustainable (human, social, economic and environmental) organisation.

Source : Veganuary

TWELVE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD CHANGE TO ORGANIC FOOD…

If your New Year resolution is to go organic then here are twelve reasons to go for it…..

  1. No ‘nasties’ organic means fewer pesticides
  2. No artificial colouring
  3. No preservatives
  4. Always free range
  5. No use of antibiotics
  6. No GM ingredients
  7. Fully traceable
  8. Good for the planet
  9. Kinder to animals
  10. Value for money
  11. Tastes better
  12. Lasts longer

3 OF THE BEST WI BOOKS FOR WI LADIES…

When my WI Country Woman’s Year 1960 by Shirley Paget book popped through my door I was so excited to open it and even more thrilled when I saw that the cover was a special retro cloth one.

I love anything WI (although not a member) and this book covers it all. From cider-making and hedgerow basketry to public speaking and committee-meeting protocol and of course, not forgetting the jam making.

If you can’t get inspired to have a go at smocking, upholstery repairs, bread making, lampshade, Christmas wreaths, wallpapering, corn dollies, Welsh quilting or crystallized flowers then I will eat my hat. It’s right up my street and I can’t wait to give one of the crafts a go.

Inside the book it says that a great deal has happened to change the lives of women living in the countryside since 1960 when this book was last published, and it is fascinating to note these changes. But we have since lost or forgotten so many rural skills and pleasures. Following the four seasons, here are dozens of different tasks and hobbies re-discovered in this WI Country Woman’s Year: Six decades on, modern readers may no longer wish to live like their countryside sisters of two generations ago, but they will be struck by the happy gusto with which the then-450,000 members of the WI went about enjoying their busy country lives throughout the year.

The WI Country Woman’s Year 1960 by Shirley Paget is available from Amazon and other good book stores at £15.99

The WI Cookbook : The First 100 Years Hardcover by Mary Gwynn, available from Amazon and other good bookshops from £11.22

This beautifully packaged book, curated by food journalist Mary Gwynn, brings together the 100 best loved members’ recipes nationwide. Organised decade by decade, and setting each recipe in its historical and social context, it spans everything from jams and preserves to main courses, puddings and bakes. Nostalgic favourites like Toad in the Hole and Kedgeree feature alongside contemporary hits such as Lamb Pot Roast with Nettle Champ and Italian Lamb with Roasted Sweet Peppers.

Here are recipes created during the war to make the most of limited supplies (like Stuffed Cod Steak and Apple and Fig Roll) and ideas to overcome the challenges of food rationing (like Elderberry and Apple Jelly and Corned Beef Hash) to current day recipes such as Venison Steaks with Quick Bearnaise Sauce and finally the WI’s own signature cake: The Centenary Fruit Cake from North Yorkshire. Fully illustrated from the archives of the WI, alongside beautiful food photography, this gorgeous cookbook will prove a firm favourite with keen cooks of all ages.

The WI Big Book of Baking Hardcover by Liz Herbert available from Amazon and other good book shops.

With over 200 recipes, the Big Book of Baking will guide you effortlessly through all the stages of bread-making as well as giving advice on how to bake the perfect cake. Suitable for beginners and experienced bakers alike, there is something here for everyone: all types of loaves, pastries, rolls and buns; sweet and savoury breads plus yeast, gluten and wheat free options; muffins and cup cakes, sponges and chocolate cakes; suggestions for cake toppings and finishes Tempting treats for every day and delicious ideas for a festive flourish – all the inspiration you need to hone your baking skills and produce impressive results every time.

THE HISTORY OF THE CHRISTMAS CRACKER…

According to WHY CHRISTMAS Christmas crackers are a traditional Christmas favorite in the UK. They were first made in 1847 by a London sweet maker called Tom Smith. He had seen the French ‘bon bon’ sweets (almonds wrapped in pretty paper) on a visit to Paris in 1840. He came back to London and tried selling sweets like that in England and also included a small motto or riddle in with the sweet. But they didn’t sell very well.

Legend says that, one night, while he was sitting in front of his log fire, he became very interested by the sparks and cracks coming from the fire. Suddenly, he thought what a fun idea it would be, if his sweets and toys could be opened with a crack when their fancy wrappers were pulled in half.

In 1861 Tom Smith launched his new range of what he called ‘Bangs of Expectation’! It’s thought that he bought the recipe for the small cracks and bangs in crackers from a fireworks company called Brock’s Fireworks.

Crackers were also nicknamed called ‘cosaques’ and were thought to be named after the ‘Cossack’ soldiers who had a reputation for riding on their horses and firing guns into the air.

When Tom died, his expanding cracker business was taken over by his three sons, Tom, Walter and Henry. Walter introduced the hats into crackers and he also traveled around the world looking for new ideas for gifts to put in the crackers.

The company built up a big range of ‘themed’ crackers. There were ones for bachelors and spinsters (single men and women), where the gifts were things like false teeth and wedding rings! There were also crackers for Suffragettes (women who campaigned to get women the vote), war heroes and even Charlie Chaplain! Crackers were also made for special occasions like Coronations. The British Royal Family still has special crackers made for them today!

For 150 years, Christmas crackers have been a traditional part of Christmas festivities; Tom Smith created the wonderful invention of the Christmas cracker in 1847. Tom Smith Crackers were granted their first Royal Warrant in 1906, and today the Tom Smith brand owned by IG Design Group UK Ltd is still the official supplier of Christmas crackers to the Royal Household, which is held in high regard. Design Group are extremely honoured and proud to design the handmade bespoke crackers that are selected by the Royal Household.

Tom Smith Crackers have a historic spirit and a breath of heritage which is represented in the designs.

Every year they research the current trends and markets to ensure our crackers are the market leaders, `demonstrating new innovative designs and concepts that are created every year to keep the interest, air of Christmas and the tradition alive, as well as refreshing the content and jokes, we ensure that they remain classic and traditional in how they look and feel.