FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT GRANDMA’S APRON..

The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few. It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that,it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven. It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. When company came,those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.. And when the weather was cold Grandma wrapped it around her arms. Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove. Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron. From the garden,it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the Autumn, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees. When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds. When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, to tell us it was time to come in for dinner. It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes. Grandma would also set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters now set theirs on the window sill to thaw. They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT GRANDMA’S APRON..

The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few.

It was also because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons used less material. But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.

And when the weather was cold Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the Autumn, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, to tell us it was time to come in for dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

Grandma would also set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool. Her granddaughters now set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

They would go crazy now trying to figure out how many germs were on that apron.

 

THE HISTORY OF BABYCHAM…

Babycham was created in the 1940s by Frances Showeing where it became one of the first drinks actively promoted to the middle-classes. Post-war, it was one of the first adverts to appear on television and it was targetted specifically at women.

The first Babycham Deer leapt into our lives and onto our glasses in the 1950s.  He was a white deer standing upright at first with all four legs together. In the 1960’s the deer turned into a golden brown colour with a loose blue bow.
In the 1960’s and 70’s, it became an international icon for chic. It was also very important in Somerset as the drink maker employed around 1,000 people.

During the late 1970s, a champagne flute with the well known yellow deer came into circulation with no wording around the base and no gilt trim. It remained as a champagne flute into the 1980’s but the deer changed from yellow to fawn and he lost his antlers.

In the 1990’s the deer disappeared with a rebrand of Babycham which they did in the hope it would appeal to both sexes. However, by 1997 the deer returned for the female sex.

You can still find Babycham in the supermarkets now and of course, it always tastes better out of a Babycham glass whatever decade it originates from!

VINTAGE GROCERY BRANDS, FIFTIES STYLE…

The hardware shops of the fifties were where you could get most of your household goods as supermarkets were not up and running then. It was home for household items like balls of string, cook’s matches, mothballs, toilet blocks and nails. You could also purchase crockery, cutlery and cooking equipment.

Some of the traditional cleaning products survived the war and are still around today. Those who have changed little in their design including Brasso (in the can), Lux Soap Flakes, Tide Washing Powder and Ajax Scouring Powder. Other popular brands include Harpic, Flash and Surf. Of course, laundry detergents were quite different with optical brighteners like Reckitts Blue which would be added to the final rinsing water to ensure the linen was whiter than white.

Even some of the old breakfast cereals are still going strong, Kellogg’s Cornflakes and Frosted Flakes (now known as Frosties) Shreddies, Quaker Puffed Wheat, and Scotts Porridge Oats.

Although the fast food was not happening until the middle of the 1950’s there was plenty of canned foods around like, soup, luncheon meat, corned beef and tinned fruit and vegetables. Frozen foods were also starting to become popular with fish fingers being one of the first ones on the market.

Of course, there are still a number of stock cupboard items still going strong now including Marmite, Oxo, Bisto, Colemans Mustard Powder and Atora Suet. Diet drinks were not available at that time but Tizer, Lucozade, Kia Oran Pepsi and Coca-cola topped the list of favourites.

If you still love some of your oldies then try the British Corner Shop below.

The British Corner Shop is a unique online supermarket for expats around the world. Whether you miss Marmite or crave Warburtons crumpets, they can deliver your British favourites straight to your door.

Their website stocks over 10,000 products from Britain’s most loved brands, meaning you can enjoy the British food you miss, wherever you are in the world.

Customer service is at the heart of their business. Since their humble beginnings in 1999, they have refined and developed British Corner Shop, building on the wants and needs of their loyal customers.

From purchasing your shopping through to the delivery, they want their customers to have total confidence when ordering with them.

You don’t have to be a British expat to use the service. If you have friends or relatives overseas who may be missing the taste of home, why not order them a box of British happiness? Their service is perfect for sending parcels of British food to Brits in the Armed Forces and others working abroad.

THE VINTAGE TEA PARTY…

The Vintage Tea Party Book by Angel Adoree is not your average book on recipes and pictures on all things vintage. This book is one you will keep on your table in the lounge for friends to pick up and browse through.

Amongst many great reviews are some from famous magazines like Glamour Magazine and The Independent Newspaper.

The Vintage Tea Party helps you plan not only stunning recipes for all sorts of delicious treats but also gives you countless styling tips for the perfect occasion.” – Glamour Magazine (SA)

“Bring out the bone china for this book from vintage guru Angel Adoree…” – The Independent

Angel Adoree cordially invites you to accompany her on a journey to create your perfect vintage tea party! Angel received £100k investment from Deborah Meaden and Theo Paphitis from Dragons Den for developing her website and for buying a shop/property in Soho for her business – Vintage Patisserie.

The Vintage Patisserie is a haven of all things glamour, vintage and retro. Run by Angel Adoree, the outstanding character you may have seen on Dragon’s Den, the Vintage Patisserie is a vintage hosting company offering bespoke tea parties from a bygone era. For that reason, there’s nowhere better to get simple, elegant advice for hosting your very own Vintage Tea Party at home than from Angel and The Vintage Tea Party Book.

As well as providing sumptuous elegant recipes to cover every time of the day, Angel’s The Vintage Tea Party Book covers the full breadth of those little touches that make the perfect vintage party: Invitations, attire, decorations, props and more. The book is broken into:

BRUNCH
What do you mean, morning is no time for a party?! High Breakfast is the height of civilization and, here, I share my most refined brunch dishes, for a morning tea party fit for a Queen. Don your headscarf and on with the preparations!

AFTERNOON
Is your pinkie finger raised at the ready? There’s nothing more British than Afternoon Tea. This chapter is a treasure trove of tea-time delights, from classics to decadent treats, and I show how to make a Union Flag for the ultimate traditional tea party.

EVENING
The evening tea party is all about glamour, giggles and good friends. On these pages, I share my most impressive recipes, for maximum impact on the eye and taste buds, to give the special people in your life the treat they deserve.

STYLE
You’ve organized the perfect vintage do, now it’s time for the perfect vintage hairdo, and the perfect vintage dress, and for getting your make-up – and your man – looking just stunning. You’ll be the most glamorous hostess in town!

The Vintage Tea Party Book embraces the style and class of the trendy London Vintage scene and illustrates how to beautifully recreate the tasty treats and classic styles at home. With a unique mixture of recipes and feature spreads with accessible tips on hairstyling, makeup methods and where to collect vintage china

Since writing The Vintage Tea Party Book Angel has written and published The Vintage Sweets Book, Vintage Tea Party Treasury, and The Vintage Tea Party Year.

THE SEWING ACADEMY…

Sewing Machine

If you want ot learn how to sew then this hands on sewing academy is the place to head. The Lorna Knight Sewing Academy offers workshops in a range of sewing techniques including courture sewing, soft furnishings, lingerie, pattern drafting and overlocking.

Everything is provided you just need to turn up and learn. Classes are limited to six with courses available for beginners.

For more details of their courses in Manchester and Staffordshire head to their website http://www.lornaknight.com

VINTAGE CHINA FOR HIRE…

My Vintage Day Crockery Hire

With everything ‘vintage’ being very fashionable at the moment, it was no surprise to find that you can now hire vintage china for your wedding/party or event.

Jo Mortimer-Bush runs ‘My Vintage Day’ crockery-hire, which has a spectacular collection of cups and sauces, plates, tea pots and tea table requisites. She had vintage wedding china at her own wedding which gave her the idea to start the business.

Most of her collection has been bought from auctions, antique fairs and car-boot sales. Most of her business has been built up by word of mouth and from her website http://www.myvintageday.co.uk

They cover Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire, Bedforshire and Hertfordshire, but will deliver further at an added cost. They also cater for afternoon tea packages which have also become fashionable for hen parties.